What’s Selling at Moxie

Located in Boston’s historic Beacon Hill neighborhood, owner Karen Fabbri opened her 750-square-foot boutique in 2001. Along with manager and co-buyer Kristen Caldon, Fabbri aims to fill Moxie with women’s shoes, bags and accessories that she “genuinely adores.” Recognized with a “Best of” award by Boston Magazine for several years running, Moxie stocks a stylish mix of designer labels, including Loeffler Randall, Pour La Victoire, Bernardo and Diane von Furstenberg.

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Located in Boston’s historic Beacon Hill neighborhood, owner Karen Fabbri opened her 750-square-foot boutique in 2001. Along with manager and co-buyer Kristen Caldon, Fabbri aims to fill Moxie with women’s shoes, bags and accessories that she “genuinely adores.” Recognized with a “Best of” award by Boston Magazine for several years running, Moxie stocks a stylish mix of designer labels, including Loeffler Randall, Pour La Victoire, Bernardo and Diane von Furstenberg.

Top-selling styles for fall: Tory Burch flats and riding boots, Delman wedges, B Brian Atwood pumps, Pajar snow/rain boots and Bloch luxury ballet flats.

Best new label added to your mix this season: B Brian Atwood.

What is your store’s go-to designer brand year-in and year-out? Tory Burch has remained our top- selling brand since the invention of the Reva flat. We also do well with Jack Rogers, Bloch, Delman, BCBG and See By ChloĆ©.

How would you describe your approach to buying? We definitely gravitate toward styles that are feminine and flirty while still being wearable for real women.

Has your customer base “recovered” more so than the overall economy? We are certainly lucky to have stores in affluent areas filled with loyal customers who appreciate their small businesses and do what they can to support us.

What has been the biggest change in their shopping and buying behavior this year? Given the tough economy the last few years, our customers have started to shift their shopping habits to look for items on sale. Unfortunately, many of the department stores have trained them to wait for friends and family specials, so even those customers who can afford to buy full-price are hesitant to do so if there isn’t a promotion.

What’s more important to your customers: label, style or price? Style is definitely the most important, followed by label for the trust factor associated with knowing a brand is good quality.

Do you predict business to be better or worse next year? I anticipate that it will be better. Our sales at the end of this year are much stronger than they were at the beginning, and I think that will continue.

—Melissa D’Agnese

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