Classic styles get the Royal Elastics treatment.

Since being established in 1996 by two Australian teens, Los Angeles-based Royal Elastics has gone through an aquisition (by K Swiss in 2001) and dissolution (sold to the investment group REH in 2009) and now, after losing its way for a couple seasons, has finally rebounded. While still creating an array of athletic-inspired styles featuring the elastic-based closures it’s known for, the brand – which offers men’s, women’s and kids’ styles – is now putting its own spin on old school favorites like desert boots, oxfords and creepers.

Share This:

Since being established in 1996 by two Australian teens, Los Angeles-based Royal Elastics has gone through an aquisition (by K Swiss in 2001) and dissolution (sold to the investment group REH in 2009) and now, after losing its way for a couple seasons, has finally rebounded. While still creating an array of athletic-inspired styles featuring the elastic-based closures it’s known for, the brand – which offers men’s, women’s and kids’ styles – is now putting its own spin on old school favorites like desert boots, oxfords and creepers.

“We use thick, stacked EVA midsoles with rubber outsoles to achieve a creeper look with bright pops of color to give them some freshness,” says John Bondoc, chief creative officer and executive vice president. “We have a clean oxford look, a wingtip tricked out with brogue details and serrated edges, and a desert boot – all on these creeper bottom units.”

The brand has reengineered its popular Brother Roland, a desert boot, using a shapelier last and taller heel and available in a selection of bright canvases and chambrays. “We’re also very excited about a small collection of hiker-inspired styles on a new, lightweight, molded EVA bottom,” Bondoc offers. “These shoes were materialized in technical nylons and utilize modern no-sew construction on selected colorways.” Wholesale prices range from $25 to $70.

Moving into Fall ’13, Royal Elastics will continue to offer shoes on the creeper bottom unit, as well as re-releasing some of its iconic athletic styles: the Smooth, the brand’s first ever shoe, and the Icon. “The Smooth XVI is tweaked to give it a more contemporary look; it’s narrower and built on a lightweight bottom unit. The Icon 2600 is remodeled on a new last and much cleaner lines,” Bondoc reveals. 

Leave a Comment: